The Student Guide to Writing: Playwriting – part two

The winners of ‘The Student Guide to Writing: Playwriting’ competition, which has been running since January, have just been chosen! I’ll hand over to Jennifer Tuckett of Central St Martins to tell you more and to announce the names of the winners. 

I’m pleased to be writing to announce the winners of The Student Guide to Writing: Playwriting, the new competition from the Bush Theatre, Oberon Books, the MA Dramatic Writing at Drama Centre London at Central Saint Martins and Writers at Work Productions.

Entries were received from all over the UK for the competition, which provided writers with the opportunity to follow lesson plans written by those leading the way in the industry prior to sending in their play.

Workshop1There are 5 winners chosen from 4 categories: schools, Universities, emerging writer and general writer.

University entries included entries from Edinburgh, Manchester, Aberystwyth, York, Leeds, Reading, Greenwich, East Anglia, RADA, Birkbeck, Brunel, Central School of Speech and Drama, Durham, Central Saint Martins, Open College of the Arts, Queen Mary, Bangor, Cambridge, University of the Arts London and others. Schools entries included entries from schools in Colchester, Rugby, London and others. Emerging and general entries were sent from all over the UK.

One of the things we were most pleased about was how many entrants commented on how useful the lesson plans had been, which are written by those who have led the way in the industry in terms of playwriting training, including Ola Animashawun, founder of the Royal Court Theatre’s young writers programme, Fin Kennedy, founder of Schoolwrights, Lucy Kerbel, founder of the Platform project for writing for young girls, Rob Drummer, Associate Dramaturg at the Bush Theatre, Steve Winter, Director of the Kevin Spacey Foundation, and others.

As much of the training coming out of the industry hasn’t been published, it can be hard to know what is being taught and thought about, especially if you’re not based in London, so we’re delighted to be able to provide access to some of this training for the first time.

The Student Guide to Writing photoThe impact this can have is massive as well – for example at a University where I used to work I saw student numbers studying playwriting rise from 0 when I joined the University (which had attempted to teach playwriting before to no success) to 8 in the modules’ first year to 40 in the modules’ second year to 80 in the modules’ third year, with many of the graduates winning awards or securing attachment programmes at professional theatres.

And, so, without further ado, the winners from The Student Guide to Writing: Playwriting are….

Schools category: Vee Thomas, Colchester Grammar School

University category: Titilola Dawudu, Central Saint Martins, and Monique Geraghty, Queen Mary, University of London

Emerging/general category: Mufaro Makubika, based in Nottingham, and Miriam Battye, based in Salford, Greater Manchester

According to Rob Drummer, Associate Dramaturg at the Bush Theatre: “The breadth and quality of submissions has been inspiring and the five very different and deserving winners have written with real vibrancy. I was impressed and heartened to see so many writers asking big questions of the world we live in and am looking forward to getting to know them and their plays over the coming months. The Bush is proud to partner on a competition that reflects the plurality of our culture and shines a light on stories and writers that aren’t always visible. I can’t wait to join in celebrating all the winners at London Writers’ Week in July.”

George Spender, Senior Editor at Oberon Books, said: “It’s a delight to see so many entries, and for all these writers to be engaging intelligently with these lesson plans. The diversity, scope, and ambition of these winning plays is to be applauded.”

The personal favourite things I noticed from the entries were: ideas/plays that were about something (often this was an exploration of a theme or idea that it felt the writer was passionate about – I think Rob’s and Ola’s advice in lesson plan one and two to think about what issues you are passionate about and what would be the one play you’d write before you die was excellent advice), use of structure/plays that held our attention the whole way through, and use of theatricality/plays that used the stage/the medium of theatre in exciting ways.

Workshop2The winner’s work will be shown as part of London Writers Week at Central Saint Martins in July, whose full schedule will be announced in early May.

Following this, the lesson plans and winners’ work will be published by Oberon Books at the end of 2016, in addition to another volume “Dramatic Writing Masterclasses: Key Advice from the Industry Masters” which will provide key advice across all forms of dramatic writing from those leading the way in the industry.

For more information on the competition or to sign up for the mailing list to be kept informed on the forthcoming production, please go to: www.thestudentguidetowriting.com

Dramatic Writing Masterclasses: Key Advice from the Industry Masters” is also available to pre-order at http://oberonbooks.com/creative-writing/dramatic-writing and “The Student Guide to Writing: Playwriting” will be published at the end of 2016, which will include the lesson plans and winning writers’ work in one volume to provide permanent access to the lesson plans and the leading training for the first time. In the meantime, below is a highlights film from the launch event, which hopefully provides some more useful advice. We hope you will join us in July to see the winner’s work and for the final free workshop on The Student Guide to Writing: Playwriting and chance to get feedback on your plays.

Jennifer Tuckett

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2 thoughts on “The Student Guide to Writing: Playwriting – part two

  1. Pingback: Writer, producer, director – Titi the writer

  2. Pingback: The Student Guide to Writing: Playwriting – part two | Sex and Relationships

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