Remembering Sir Peter Hall: 1930-2017

There will be many tributes to the great Sir Peter Hall. As his publisher it is only right that I add my own fond memories.

My association with Peter began in 2000 when his then agent, Mike Shaw of Curtis Brown, invited me to lunch at Bentley’s oyster bar in Piccadilly. The choice of a smart venue already told me that it was to be an important conversation. As Mike focussed his penetrating gaze on my every move, for about an hour the conversation seemed to meander around various topics until I asked “Mike you haven’t brought me here to talk about love, life, art and death. What is it?” ‘Peter Hall’, he said. Mike wanted Oberon to publish The Peter Hall Diaries and Peter’s autobiography Making an Exhibition of Myself. My first question was ‘How much?’, and I played cool when the answer came. But both books had already been published and allowed to go out of print. Not wanting Oberon to become a reprint house, I stuck my neck out and said ‘Would we get the next book?’

The swift answer was ‘That will be another £…..’ ‘Done,’ I replied, still acting cool. We shook hands on the deal and from then on Peter and I developed a warm and exciting working relationship.

Peter Hall Rehearsing The Oresteia, 1981, ©Nobby Clark

It was a turning point in Oberon’s history. We were 15 years old and the list was a lot shorter than it is now. But Mike had persuaded the great man that we were going places. It was arranged that I meet Peter with his publicist Lynne Kirwin at a small seafood restaurant in Chelsea. The meeting went well and the restaurant (Le Suquet, now gone) became the hideaway where Peter and I would meet from time to time and discuss his new ideas for books in privacy.

The overnight turn-around in Oberon’s fortunes was like Manna from Heaven. The great Sir Peter had turned to this small publisher in Holloway, while we were still struggling for credibility and prominence in the theatre industry. The mood changed. ‘If they’re good enough for Peter Hall, then they’re good enough for me.’ So went the buzz round the Business, in particular literary agents who had mainly dealt with the big publishers.

So we surged ahead with the Diaries, the Autobiography and a new book, Exposed by the Mask, Peter’s Trinity Lectures on Beckett, Pinter, Mozart and Shakespeare.

‘The wisest and most stimulating short book about theatre since Peter Brook’s The Empty Space’ Charles Spencer, Sunday Telegraph.

Peter became ever more loyal and ever more meticulous about the preparation of his books. As they say, he liked to get the ink on his fingers. He missed nothing, and he taught me many things about my own job. How does a book on acting become a real and useful teaching tool? It was Peter who shaped the layout and typesetting of Shakespeare’s Advice to the Players making a complex guide look simple. Often criticised for being an ‘Iambic Fundamentalist’ when it comes to Shakespeare, Peter stuck to his guns. He didn’t like actors inserting pauses and line breaks where none were intended. It all had to come ‘trippingly on the tongue’ as Hamlet says to the Players.  I understood what he meant when I once heard an excruciating recitation of a Sonnet by a student actor who inserted pauses you could drive a bus through. It broke the flow, we lost our focus, and it was an emasculated performance.

Peter Hall, Dec 2007 ©Nobby Clark

We launched Shakespeare’s Advice to the Players at the National Theatre. On the way I picked Peter up at a church hall in Clapham where had had been rehearsing all day. Arriving at the National just in time, Peter stepped out of the car, walked straight into the building to the vast stage of the Lyttelton, and delivered a thirty minute talk to a full house without using any notes. Afterwards, he patiently signed books for many fans waiting in a very long line.

Ever in awe of Peter I always topped my emails with his full title ‘Sir Peter Hall, CBE’ before the more familiar ‘Dear Peter’.  I once asked him why he chose Oberon to publish his work. His response was unequivocal. ‘You publish new writers.’ That enthusiasm for new work ran through his career. He must have known that he was giving new writing a massive boost by joining Oberon.

I tried to return his loyalty whenever there was an opportunity. When Peter and his team were in Denver mounting Tantalus, the ten play cycle by John Barton, there was a dispute over cuts. So I rang his secretary at the Denver residence in case any cuts would be made to the text. It soon became clear that happiness among the team was in short supply. So I offered to take everyone to dinner to cheer them up. ‘But you’re in London!’ Well, it’s only a six hour flight and I was in Denver by the next day. For politeness’ sake the booking had been made for the coffee shop in a smart downtown hotel. A coffee shop? This would never do, so I rushed to the other end of the building to the hotel’s grander restaurant. Passing Peter and his secretary in the lobby I heard Peter say ‘He sussed that out in thirty seconds.’ But there was still an obstacle ahead. The Maître D said imperiously that the restaurant was fully booked. I despaired. I had just flown in from London to take eight people to dinner and no table. Only a bold gesture could help me now – the time honoured $100 bill quickly produced out of my back pocket. A table was promptly found.

At the start of dinner I studied the wine list with prices soaring to $4000 plus. Peter leaned over and whispered in my ear. ‘James, a $50 bottle will do.’

I still adore him.

Peter Hall, 2009 ©Nobby Clark

– James Hogan, Publisher, Oberon Books

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New Awards, Nominations and Prizes

The winners of the 2016 Critic’s Circle Theatre Awards were announced on Tuesday 26th January at a ceremony held at the Prince of Wales Theatre in the West End.

Here at Oberon Books we were delighted to see so many of our wonderfully talented writers and their colleagues represented among the nominees and winners of the evening. 

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Best Actress was given to Denise Gough for her incredible performace as ‘Emma’ in Duncan Macmillan‘s play about recovering addicts People, Places and Things. Denise said of its success; “I’m under no illusion: our play is transferring because of our amazing reviews as well as word of mouth. I’m very grateful for what it means for this play.”
The West End transfer of People, Places and Things is running at the Wyndham’s Theatre from 15th March – 4th June 2016.

Robert Icke was awarded Best Director for his epic 3 hour 40 minute adaptation of Oresteia, which was part of the Almeida Greek season, before transferring to Trafalgar studios.

The Jack Tinker Award for Most Promising Newcomer went to David Moorst, for his portrayal of 17 year-old Liam in Gary Owen‘s play Violence and Son. Moorst also took home the Emerging Talent awards at the 2015 London Evening Standard Awards – clearly one to watch!

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Elsewhere, The Susan Smith Blackburn Prize has also announced the finalists for its 2015–16 playwriting award, the oldest and largest prize given to female playwrights.

The ten finalists – narrowed down from over 150 – include Rachel Cusk for Medea, and fellow Oberon playwright Dominique Morisseau for Skeleton Crew. We’ll have our fingers firmly crossed for these two talented women! The winner will be announced at the Awards Presentation on 22nd February at the National Theatre in London.

Black Plays Series at The National Theatre

Throughout June 2015, The National Theatre are hosting a series of readings and discussions entitled the Black Plays Series. Oberon are delighted to publish all three of the writers featured: Mojisola Adebayo, Tunde Ikoli and Michael Abbensetts. In this informal series, their plays will be read by actors, followed by lively group discussion led by Natasha Bonnelame (previously the Black Plays Archive Project Manager).

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Muhammad Ali and Me is a lyrical coming-of-age story, following the parallel struggles of a gay child growing up in foster care and the black Muslim boxing hero’s fight against racism and the Vietnam war.
Mojisola Adebayo is a British-born, Nigerian/Danish performer, playwright, director, producer, workshop leader and teacher. Her work is concerned with power, identity, personal and social change. Mojisola teaches in the department of Theatre and Performance at Goldsmiths, University of London. She teaches on the BA in American Theatre Arts at Rose Bruford College and is studying for her PhD at Queen Mary University of London.
This event will be held on Sat 13th June 

 

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Scrape off the Black is set in London’s East End in 1973. Trevor organises a surprise party on the release of his brother Andy from Borstal. But Rose, his bingo-playing, pill-popping mother, has other plans.
Tunde Ikoli was born in London’s East End to a Cornish mother and Nigerian father. After leaving school at 15, he spent two years as a trainee tailor’s cutter, before writing and co-directingTunde’s Film, shown at the London, Edinburgh, Mannheim and San Francisco film festivals. Since 1977 Ikoli’s plays have been produced at a number of theatres including the Bush Theatre, Riverside Studios, Theatre Royal Stratford East, and the Tricycle Theatre.
This event will be held on Sat 20th June

 

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Alterations is a comedy set in a tailor’s shop, inspired by a real visit to a small room off Carnaby Street where two black tailors had set up shop with just two sewing machines and an ironing board. Performed in London, New Jersey and California, it offers a lively version of black entrepreneurship.
Michael Abbensetts was born in Guyana, moved to London in 1963, and began his career writing short stores. Inspired after seeing a performance of John Osborne’s Look Back in Anger, he turned to playwriting and his first play Sweet Talk premiered at the Royal Court in 1973, receiving the George Devine Award.
This event will be held on Sat 27th June

 

To find out more information about these events, and buy tickets, visit the National Theatre’s website.
To look at these titles in more detail, click the images above to be taken to the Oberon Books website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kate Bassett shortlisted for HW Fisher Prize

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Kate Bassett‘s book In Two Minds: A biography of Jonathan Miller has been shortlisted for the HW Fisher Prize for Best First Biography.

For a taste of what’s inside, and to see why Miller is regarded as ‘one of the most amazing conversationalists the world has ever produced’, head to the National Theatre’s Soundcloud to hear author and subject in conversation in a live Platform event.